GRA
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Thu Dec 17, 2020 10:53 pm

GCC:
SoCalGas to test technology that separates hydrogen from natural gas when the two are blended in pipelines
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/1 ... algas.html

With clean hydrogen gaining recognition worldwide as a carbon-free fuel capable of making a significant contribution to addressing climate change, Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) will field test a new technology that can simultaneously separate and compress hydrogen from a blend of hydrogen and natural gas.

Created by Netherlands-based HyET Hydrogen, the technology is designed to provide pure highly-compressed hydrogen wherever a natural gas distribution system exists.

The new technology—Electrochemical Hydrogen Purification and Compression (EHPC)—works by applying an electrical current across a hydrogen-selective membrane to allow only hydrogen to permeate it while blocking the natural gas components. Continuously applying the electrical current builds up and pressurizes the hydrogen. . . .

To test the technology, SoCalGas will blend hydrogen in concentrations from 3-15%, with methane, the primary component of natural gas. That blend of gases will then be injected through a simulated natural gas pipeline testing system into the EHPC system to continuously extract and compress the hydrogen at a rate of 10 kg per day.

SoCalGas’ testing will provide performance data that will enable fine-tuning and optimization of the EHPC system to accelerate scaling up the technology. Within the next two years, the EHPC technology is expected to be scaled to produce 100 kg of hydrogen a day or more from a single EHPC system, enough to fill 20 fuel cell electric vehicles.

The project is scheduled to begin in March at SoCalGas’ Engineering Analysis Center in Pico Rivera, California and slated to be complete by the third quarter of 2021.

At scale, the technology would allow hydrogen to be easily and affordably transported via the natural gas pipeline system, then extracted and compressed at fueling stations that provide hydrogen for fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs).

SoCalGas also recently announced a program to study blending hydrogen into its natural gas pipelines. If approved by regulators, the program would be the first step toward establishing a statewide standard for injecting hydrogen into the natural gas grid. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 12512
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Fri Dec 18, 2020 8:16 pm

GCC:
IRENA sees renewable hydrogen at least cost-possible within decade
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/1 ... irena.html

Hydrogen produced with renewable electricity could compete on costs with fossil fuel alternatives by 2030, according to a new report from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). A combination of falling costs for solar and wind power, improved performance as well as economies of scale for electrolyzers could make it possible.

The report—Green Hydrogen Cost Reduction: The report—Green Hydrogen Cost Reduction: scaling up electrolyzers to meet the 1.5 C climate goal—looks at drivers for innovation and presents strategies that governments can peruse to reduce the cost of electrolyzers by 40% in the short term and by up to 80% in the long term. . . .

Today, green hydrogen is 2-3 times more expensive than “blue” hydrogen, produced from fossil fuels in combination with carbon capture and storage (CCS). The production cost for green hydrogen is determined by the renewable electricity price, the investment cost of the electrolyzer and its operating hours.

Renewables have already become the
the cheapest source of power in many parts of the world, with auctions reaching record price-lows below US$20 per megawatt-hour (MWh). While low-cost electricity is a necessary condition for competitive green hydrogen, investment costs for electrolysis facilities must fall significantly too. . . .

Standardization and mass-manufacturing of the electrolyzer stacks, efficiency in operation as well as the optimization of material procurement and supply chains will be equally important to bring down costs. For that, today’s manufacturing capacity of less than 1 GW would have to massively grow beyond 100 GW in the next 10 to 15 years.

In the best-case scenario, using low-cost renewable electricity at US$20/MWh in large, cost-competitive electrolyser facilities could produce green hydrogen at a competitive cost with blue hydrogen already today. If rapid scale-up and aggressive electrolyzers deployment take place in the next decade, green hydrogen could then start competing on costs with blue hydrogen by 2030 in many countries, making it cheaper than other low-carbon alternatives before 2040, IRENA’s analysis shows.

There's a link to the report.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 12512
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Sun Dec 20, 2020 8:20 pm

GCC:
Yara planning 500 kton/year green ammonia project in Norway
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/1 ... -yara.html

Leading fertilizer company Yara plans to electrify fully its ammonia plant in Porsgrunn, Norway with the potential to cut 800,000 tonnes of CO2 per year, equivalent to the emissions from 300,000 passenger cars. Production from the electrified ammonia unit would be some 500,000 tonnes per year of green ammonia. . . .

Ammonia’s chemical properties make it suited for the hydrogen economy. It does not require cooling to extreme temperatures, and has a higher energy density than liquid hydrogen (3.75 kWh/liter vs. 2.0 kWh/liter and 5.22 kWh/kg vs. 33.33 kWh/kg), making it more efficient to transport and store. Ammonia (NH3) is therefore the most promising hydrogen carrier and zero-carbon shipping fuel.

leading position within global ammonia production, logistics and trade, Yara aims to capture opportunities within shipping, agriculture and industrial applications, in a market expected to grow by 60% over the next two decades.

In 2019, the company partnered with Nel to test Nel’s new prototype water electrolyzer technology at Porsgrunn. The capacity of the electrolyzer will be 5 MW corresponding to 1% of the hydrogen production in Porsgrunn. It is expected to be installed in 2022.

To make its vision of zero-emission ammonia production in Norway a reality, Yara is seeking partners and government support. Currently, the cost of green ammonia is estimated to be 2-4x higher than conventional product. If the required public co-funding and regulatory framework is in place, the project could be operational in 2026.

The project would eliminate one of Norway’s largest static CO2 sources, and would be a major contributor for Norway to reach its Paris agreement commitments. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

cwerdna
Posts: 11654
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Delivery Date: 28 Jul 2013
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Mon Dec 21, 2020 8:44 pm

Another fuel-cell outage hampers Bay Area fuel-cell drivers
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/11 ... ll-drivers

'19 Bolt Premier
'13 Leaf SV w/premium (owned)
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Please don't PM me with Leaf questions. Just post in the topic that seems most appropriate.

GRA
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Mon Dec 21, 2020 8:51 pm

GCC:
Methanol fuel cell developer Blue World closes €6M investment round, leases production building
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/1 ... world.html

Blue World Technologies’ methanol fuel cells are combined with batteries in hybrid configurations. The complete system includes methanol reformer for fuel conversion, DC/DC for power conversion and fuel cell stack for power production. The fuel cell control unit governs the fuel cell system as well as communicates with the vehicle. The methanol fuel cell system is based on High-Temperature PEM technology and methanol to hydrogen reforming. . . .

On the facilities side, Blue World Technologies will take over the new building on 1 January 2021 and will initiate installation and test of production equipment in the following months. The production facility will have a production capacity of up to 5,000 units (50 MW) per year. According to the plan, the initial production in the new production facilities is planned to start in mid-2021 as a pre-series production. . . .

Blue World Technologies is continuing the planning of a production site with an aim to reach a full-scale commercial production capacity of 50,000 fuel cell units within three years.

Good luck to them, but unlikely.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

Oils4AsphaultOnly
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Mon Dec 21, 2020 10:54 pm

cwerdna wrote:
Mon Dec 21, 2020 8:44 pm
Another fuel-cell outage hampers Bay Area fuel-cell drivers
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/11 ... ll-drivers
So a tanker transporting liquid hydrogen (3480 kg max capacity - losing 2% per day due to boil-off) would consume 400 gallons of diesel (averaging 5mpg; ignoring the fuel spent to drive the tanker back!) to deliver this 3270kg (2.5 days of truck driving time to cover 2000 miles from Lousiana to Nor Cal) of H2.

That's the best case scenario, since liquid H2 is denser than pressurized H2. But that comes at a cost of 30% of the energy content to liquify due to the extreme low temperatures (https://www.energy.gov/eere/fuelcells/l ... n-delivery). Transporting gaseous H2 in tube trailers takes less energy to produce, but would consume the same 400 gallons of diesel to deliver only 250kg of H2 in steel tubes (https://www.energy.gov/eere/fuelcells/h ... e-trailers)! Essentially 1 for 1 transport consumption to delivered product ratio! The waste in the system is SO HIGH that this is somehow economically justified by Air Products?! And that's all being paid for by our tax dollars. I can only shake my head and cringe.
:: Leaf S30 :: build date: Sep '16 :: purchased: Nov '16
:: Model 3 LR (Turo) :: acquired 9 May '18
:: Model Y LR AWD (wife's) :: acquired 30 Dec '20
100% Zero transportation emissions (except when I walk) and loving it!

GRA
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Tue Dec 22, 2020 6:47 pm

Actually, the fuel is being supported by the car manufacturers, but it certainly is silly to transport it all that way when we should be making it here, and it demonstrates the need for more (and more diverse) local production including on-site, not that anyone's surprised by that need.

Also, shipping it by pipeline as well, either separate or, for the near-term, blended with methane as is already being done at dem-val levels in various places. Eventually large quantities will be quite literally shipped, either as LH2 or perhaps ammonia or something similar, which doesn't require low temps to liquify. Countries like Chile and Australia are planning to be major exporters of such, as they have renewable resources far in excess of their own needs.

Boil-off shouldn't be an issue once the transport vehicles are also H2 FCEVs. I imagine the stations which now receive their H2 as liquid have a service tank that is filled by boil-off from the main storage tanks.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 12512
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Tue Dec 22, 2020 7:00 pm

Both GCC:
Haldor Topsoe and Aker Carbon Capture to cooperate on low-carbon hydrogen solutions
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/1 ... aldor.html

. . . Based on syngas, Haldor Topsoe’s hydrogen process can be used to convert different feedstocks, from natural gas to heavy naphtha, into the purest hydrogen possible, with minimum energy consumption and emissions.

Aker Carbon Capture’s proprietary carbon capture process uses a mixture of water and organic amine solvents to absorb the CO2. This process can be applied on emissions from various sources, from gas, coal, cement, refineries, and waste-to-energy through to hydrogen and other process industries.

The European Union foresees investments of €11 billion for retrofitting half of the existing European hydrogen plants with carbon capture and storage before 2030. . . .

Noble Gas Systems demonstrates latest generation of conformable tanks for high-pressure gases
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/1 ... noble.html

Noble Gas Systems . . . has demonstrated its latest generation of conformable gas tanks, which can be configured into existing vehicle architectures.

The new tanks, with working pressures of 350 bar (5,000 psi), are lightweight and less than 80mm (3.1") wide. 700 bar versions are under development. . . .

A safer alternative to other options, the system currently meets burst and hydrogen permeation requirements for 350-bar working pressures and has a leak-before-burst failure mode to eliminate the opportunity for a catastrophic, instantaneous release of high-pressure gas. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

cwerdna
Posts: 11654
Joined: Fri Jun 03, 2011 4:31 pm
Delivery Date: 28 Jul 2013
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Sat Feb 20, 2021 6:42 pm

Toyota Mirai Hydrogen Cars Now for Rent to Vancouver Lyft Drivers
It's one of few ways to get behind the wheel of the limited-distribution Mirai, even if it is only for a few weeks at a time for ride-sharing drivers.
https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a3549 ... t-drivers/

'19 Bolt Premier
'13 Leaf SV w/premium (owned)
'13 Leaf SV w/QC + LED & premium (lease over)

Please don't PM me with Leaf questions. Just post in the topic that seems most appropriate.

GRA
Posts: 12512
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Re: Hydrogen and FCEVs discussion thread

Sun Feb 21, 2021 2:33 am

All GCC:
Logan Energy to support delivery of Holyhead Hydrogen Hub in Wales
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/0 ... logan.html

Scotland-based clean energy solutions provider Logan Energy won a public tender contract with Welsh social enterprise, Menter Môn, to support the delivery of a hydrogen production plant, refueling and distribution hub in Holyhead, North Wales. The Holyhead Hydrogen Hub will be a first of its kind and is supported by the Isle of Anglesey County Council and the Welsh Government’s Local Transport Fund. . . .

As an industry which contributes to around a quarter of global CO2 emissions, the energy-intensive haulage and heavy transport sector is in urgent need of efficient and scalable low-carbon energy solutions if net-zero targets are to be met by 2050. The current fuel demands of heavy industry goods vehicles in the Holyhead region are large and an initial study has identified a supply rate of more than 400 kg/day can kick-start the Hub which could be established by 2023.

As the second largest roll-on, roll-off (RoRo) port in the UK, with 500,000 annual HGV movements, Holyhead was identified as an ideal site for the Hub, hosting large HGV movements annually as well as potential demands at the port. Providing an ideal launchpad for larger, scaled-up green hydrogen production, the site will help release the full potential of the region’s vast renewable energy resources.

Scale-up can extend to trains, public transport, and shipping, and will include diversification to other hydrogen markets such as heat, industry, power, and agriculture. With a target operational date of 2023, this project will be the first to be developed in Wales under a Hub & Spoke model, which will see collaborations with complementary developments in other regions of Wales, the UK, and the Republic of Ireland. . . .


Groupe Renault and Faurecia to collaborate on hydrogen storage systems for light commercial vehicles
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/0 ... nault.html

. . . Starting at the end of 2021, Faurecia will supply hydrogen storage systems for a first fleet of light commercial vehicles. These systems will be developed and produced at its global center of expertise in Bavans, France.

As volumes, increase production will be extended to a new plant dedicated to hydrogen storage systems that Faurecia is building in Allenjoie, France. . . .

DOE to award up to $20M for projects demonstrating integration of nuclear power and hydrogen
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/0 ... 2nuke.html

. . . Activities of interest include nuclear-powered hydrogen production (at least 1 megawatt), with flexible operation to manage electrical demand and intermittent renewable energy on the grid. Proposed projects must also include integration of a specific hydrogen end use demonstration, focusing on applications that offer potential for significant greenhouse gas emission reduction, as well as cost competitive market potential.

End-use applications may include, but are not limited to, transportation, power generation, or industrial processes. Examples include using hydrogen for the production of chemicals such as ammonia or other hydrogen carriers, or for manufacturing products such as steel or cement. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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