jlsoaz
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Mon Apr 19, 2021 6:07 am

LeftieBiker wrote:
Wed Apr 14, 2021 5:47 pm
I agree that what happened with the earlier adopters is happened on a larger scale now: having gotten that taste of EV driving with their PHEV, many people are going on to full-fledged EVs for their next vehicle, now that the range is in most cases at least adequate.
Yup, agree with this pretty strongly. I knew better than to go this long way around, but somehow I ended up as an example. Got into a Leaf in 2012 (I knew it was a lame short range BEV), and then out of the frying pan and into the fire in a Volt in 2017. Finally bit the financial bullet and made it (barely) into a (barely) adequate used long(er)-range BEV in 2020.

These are still (very) early days and the readability of the situation is made harder by the special nature of the hold-back that the automakers have been engaging in, en masse, and with the markets, particularly in some regions, not really being fully competitive in all ways. So, it's not a piece of cake (in my opinion) to diagnose what will happen, and with multiple motives and factors at play:
- Is it easier for manufacturers to make PHEVs? And does making good PHEVS help them (financially and in strategic market position) to prolong the situation (rather than hasten toward BEVS)?
- Just as short range BEVS were not (at all) "the good stuff", so too shouldn't we understand that short EV range PHEVs are not the good stuff.
- Will decent zero carbon drop-in replacement synthetic fuels in time to make an unexpected difference in the path to BEVs? Or does none of this matter and the advantages of BEV just blast through the market and that's that?

I am sometimes struck by the comparison case of compact fluorescent bulbs: a transition technology that was flawed (especially since they contained mercury, so as a transition they were not good because they would be hard to get rid of once the even-better technology (LED Bulbs) was ready. It seems like CFLs were regarded as an answer, or as a transition answer, in at least some of our society, for awhile, and then no. I don't hear much any more about difficulty in transition to LEDs In fact, last I looked, I was unable to find any sort of decent widely-accessible data and charts on penetration of efficient LED bulbs worldwide. It's as though the transition to the final tech happened, or was on its way (including policy support of banning the old tech once the new tech was ready) and discussion of the old tech, and the transition tech, and of the issue really, were reduced. So, I don't really know fully how it worked out. There are plenty of factors that make this a not-great comparison to ICV/PHEV/BEV, but I still think at times it is worth asking if PHEVs be somewhat akin to CFLs.
2015 Model S 70 Oct 2020 -
2013 Volt - Oct 2017- Oct 2020
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opinions expressed are my own

WetEV
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Mon Apr 19, 2021 7:22 am

jlsoaz wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 6:07 am
{LEDs vs CFLs} including policy support of banning the old tech once the new tech was ready) and discussion of the old tech, and the transition tech, and of the issue really, were reduced. So, I don't really know fully how it worked out. There are plenty of factors that make this a not-great comparison to ICV/PHEV/BEV, but I still think at times it is worth asking if PHEVs be somewhat akin to CFLs.
I still have two old tech bulbs, and at least one of them can't be replaced with an LED. The oven light.

I don't have a lava light, but I just did a search for incandescent bulbs, and a bulb to replace the bulb in a lava light was one of the first real hits. Oven lights. After a bunch of LED bulbs designed to look like old school incandescent bulbs.

A search for CFLs finds both what I might expect, and some 4000 Lumen CFLs for some special purpose in photography.

Likewise, I expect ICE/PHEV to live on in a very small way for a very long time.
Last edited by WetEV on Mon Apr 19, 2021 2:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
WetEV
#49
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WetEV
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Mon Apr 19, 2021 7:56 am

GRA wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 8:36 pm
WetEV wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 12:22 pm
The current Federal tax incentive means at a 18kWh battery gets the full tax credit. And there is no incentive for going to a higher EV motor power vs gas engine power.
The customers are capable of deciding what performance they want and are willing to pay for. The one performance mandate I might impose on PHEVs other than a true hold mode is that they be able to reach and cruise at 80 mph on the battery alone, as that's the highest speed limit on any U.S. public road.
Yet my point is that if you want a lot of electric miles, the electric performance needs to be acceptable to consumers. For example, "80 MPH on the flat" would not be electric miles climbing a pass. Like say I-90 over Snoqualmie Pass. Or US2 over Steven's pass. The higher the electric performance, the more electric miles. The old PIP isn't going to get many all electric miles on the freeway, with a top electric speed of 62 MPH and an electric 0-60 time that could be never.

If consumers are buying the car for other reasons that using less gasoline, such as a subsidy paid to reduce gasoline consumption, then the subsidy might want to be based on the car actually being driveable in all electric mode.
WetEV
#49
Most everything around here is wet during the rainy season. And the rainy season is long.
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GRA
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Wed Apr 21, 2021 5:14 pm

WetEV wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 7:56 am
GRA wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 8:36 pm
WetEV wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2021 12:22 pm
The current Federal tax incentive means at a 18kWh battery gets the full tax credit. And there is no incentive for going to a higher EV motor power vs gas engine power.
The customers are capable of deciding what performance they want and are willing to pay for. The one performance mandate I might impose on PHEVs other than a true hold mode is that they be able to reach and cruise at 80 mph on the battery alone, as that's the highest speed limit on any U.S. public road.
Yet my point is that if you want a lot of electric miles, the electric performance needs to be acceptable to consumers. For example, "80 MPH on the flat" would not be electric miles climbing a pass. Like say I-90 over Snoqualmie Pass. Or US2 over Steven's pass. The higher the electric performance, the more electric miles. The old PIP isn't going to get many all electric miles on the freeway, with a top electric speed of 62 MPH and an electric 0-60 time that could be never.

Most PHEVs don't need "a lot of electric miles", they just need enough to run electrically for routine driving, particularly in the most congested areas. If you're a mega-commuter who's got a long commute every day, just lease a Bolt (or buy an Aptera) and have done with it. But the average American driver averages about 13,500 miles/year or 37 miles a day, and that includes all their trips, so a PHEV with much more than that is excessive, and wasted for most drivers.

I left out a lot of the details I'd include in the reg If I were writing it: it would be more specific, requiring maintaining 80 up a moderate slope of say 1-3 or maybe even 6% or into a 5 or 10 mph headwind, while running all hotel loads with at least two occupants or even at GVWR. If more extreme conditions force you to slow to 75 or even 70 that would probably be fine with many people, and for those who want 80 regardless manufacturers can design cars to suit.

Of course, the PiP's electric mode was very limited, but then given the typical urban commute speeds 62 mph isn't much of a limitation in congested traffic, which is where you get the most environmental benefit from electric driving - I doubt many people are long-distance cruising at 80 mph over Snoqualmie pass during a stop-and-go commute - that's what the ICE is for. The federal HOV lane standard requires a 45 mph average speed, and at least until California limited SO HOV stickers to a max. of 4 years, California wasn't attaining anywhere near that - Google "High-Occupancy Vehicle Lane Degradation in California" for a 2018 pdf.

I don't know if we're in compliance now. I know when I had to drive I-880 in a non-HOV lane once during the morning commute a few years back, it took me 1 hour to go 16 miles, and the HOV lane only appeared to be averaging a few mph more - if I ever hit 45 it was for a few seconds, and the same was true for them.

WetEV wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 7:56 am
If consumers are buying the car for other reasons that using less gasoline, such as a subsidy paid to reduce gasoline consumption, then the subsidy might want to be based on the car actually being driveable in all electric mode.

What do you think I was talking about by requiring a true hold mode and specifying minimum electric performance?
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

jlsoaz
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Thu Apr 22, 2021 7:39 pm

WetEV wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 7:22 am
jlsoaz wrote:
Mon Apr 19, 2021 6:07 am
{LEDs vs CFLs} including policy support of banning the old tech once the new tech was ready) and discussion of the old tech, and the transition tech, and of the issue really, were reduced. So, I don't really know fully how it worked out. There are plenty of factors that make this a not-great comparison to ICV/PHEV/BEV, but I still think at times it is worth asking if PHEVs be somewhat akin to CFLs.
I still have two old tech bulbs, and at least one of them can't be replaced with an LED. The oven light.

I don't have a lava light, but I just did a search for incandescent bulbs, and a bulb to replace the bulb in a lava light was one of the first real hits. Oven lights. After a bunch of LED bulbs designed to look like old school incandescent bulbs.

A search for CFLs finds both what I might expect, and some 4000 Lumen CFLs for some special purpose in photography.

Likewise, I expect ICE/PHEV to live on in a very small way for a very long time.
Yeah, I think it's pretty clear that the old tech will have a very small niche, at least for awhile, but the question of the thread is about trying to gauge a tech to see if it is transitional or longer-lasting. In the case of cfl tech, it appears (from what little I know) to have been merely transitional, though maybe it is sticking around more than I realize. It seems hard to get data. PHEV? In some aspects the momentum seems toward full-blown BEVs. There's a black swan to be dealt with, if zero-carbon synthetic drop-in gasoline replacement fuels do improve in price and availability and volume, but for those of us who know the advantages of the best long-range BEVs, and that we are still early that tech, it's hard not to see PHEVs as just a bit of a transitional thing, regardless of zero-carbon fuels. ICV and PHEV will be around for hundreds or thousands of years in small numbers. The question is will PHEVs be around in somewhat larger numbers, or even continue to be revised and manufactured if/when the ghg problem is in-hand?
2015 Model S 70 Oct 2020 -
2013 Volt - Oct 2017- Oct 2020
2012 SL Lease Oct 2012-Dec 2015
http://www.pluginamerica.org/surveys/ba ... hp?vid=229
opinions expressed are my own

WetEV
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Thu Apr 22, 2021 9:22 pm

jlsoaz wrote:
Thu Apr 22, 2021 7:39 pm
Yeah, I think it's pretty clear that the old tech will have a very small niche, at least for awhile, but the question of the thread is about trying to gauge a tech to see if it is transitional or longer-lasting. In the case of cfl tech, it appears (from what little I know) to have been merely transitional, though maybe it is sticking around more than I realize. It seems hard to get data. PHEV? In some aspects the momentum seems toward full-blown BEVs. There's a black swan to be dealt with, if zero-carbon synthetic drop-in gasoline replacement fuels do improve in price and availability and volume, but for those of us who know the advantages of the best long-range BEVs, and that we are still early that tech, it's hard not to see PHEVs as just a bit of a transitional thing, regardless of zero-carbon fuels. ICV and PHEV will be around for hundreds or thousands of years in small numbers. The question is will PHEVs be around in somewhat larger numbers, or even continue to be revised and manufactured if/when the ghg problem is in-hand?
I have not any good answer.

It seems to me that there are niche requirements that BEVs will not do well at.

So some other fuel/energy store, such as synthetic, bio-fuel, hydrogen, Al-air batteries: pick one or name a different one, is likely to fill that niche.

Depending on factors I can only guess at, a PHEV might or might not be useful as electric power is cheaper, and doing a PHEV will be more expensive than a pure ICE (or whatever). Will reduced operational costs pay off the extra cost?
WetEV
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alozzy
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Thu Apr 22, 2021 11:17 pm

PHEVs will persist in the US for as long as the government allows them. In Western Europe and many parts of Asia, I suspect they will no longer be offered as new cars in the near future.

In the Middle East, Russian, Venezuela, and other oil producing, non democratic countries, I would guess ICE cars will only disappear when oil runs out.
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SageBrush
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Fri Apr 23, 2021 10:37 am

The most basic argument for or against PHEV isn't so much a matter of convenience now that truly fast DC fast charging is proliferating, it is a matter of manufacturing: what is cheaper for a 400 mile range vehicle ? Extra battery, or an ICE system ? If the ICE system is a manufacturer cost of USD $4,000 and an EV needs 50 more kWh to make up the range difference, the manufacturer costs has to drop below $80 a kWh to kill ICE.

Tesla is probably a year away if their improved silicon tech pans out, and others a few years later.,

---
My wife and I test drove the Tesla Model 'Y' yesterday as part of pre-planning for when the LEAF needs replacement. Wife was happy, I prefer my Model 3**. But regardless, we agree that our next EV is going to have 400+ EPA miles to make trips in semi-rural area less L2 dependent.

** Partly because the Model 3 has much better driving dynamics than a CUV, and because I was unhappy with the view through the rear view mirror. It is a slat about 8 - 10 inches high. Perhaps Tesla will redesign the hatch to give more view.
2013 LEAF 'S' Model with QC & rear-view camera
Bought Jan 2017 from N. California
Two years in Colorado, now in NM
03/18: 58 Ahr, 28k miles
11/18: 56.16 Ahr, 30k miles
09/20: 54.3 Ahr; 38k miles
-----
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alozzy
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Fri Apr 23, 2021 10:58 am

Or, that gap can be closed by introducing a carbon tax on gasoline, at the pump. In British Columbia, where I live, we have had a carbon tax for many years. It's not coincidence that we also have one of the highest EV adoption rates in North America.

A carbon tax would also influence PHEV sales, as it might be enough to sway someone to purchase a BEV instead. Getting the majority of North Americans to purchase a BEV, rather than a PHEV, as their primary car is going to take some sort of disincentive - tax credits clearly aren't enough.

Thanks to our carbon tax, almost 10% of new cars sales in BC are for hybrids/EVs and 80% of those are for BEVs. Still a long way to go, but it wasn't that long ago that that figure was around 1%
Last edited by alozzy on Fri Apr 23, 2021 3:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Vancouver, CA owner of a 2013 Ocean Blue SV + QC, purchased 01/2017 in WA
Zencar 12/20/24/30A L1/L2 portable EVSE
1-1/4" Curt #11396 hitch
After market, DIY LED DRLs
LeafSpy Pro + Konnwei KW902 ELM327 BT OBDII dongle
Loving my first BEV :D

SageBrush
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Re: Are PHEVs a transitional technology? Or a long lasting use case?

Fri Apr 23, 2021 11:10 am

alozzy wrote:
Fri Apr 23, 2021 10:58 am
Or, that gap can be closed by introducing a carbon tax on gasoline, at the pump. In British Columbia, where I live, we have had a carbon tax for many years. It's not coincidence that we also have one of the highest EV adoption rates in North America.

A carbon tax would also influence PHEV sales, as it might be enough to sway someone to purchase a BEV instead. Getting the majority of North Americans to purchase a BEV, rather than a PHEV, as their primary car is going to take some sort of disincentive - tax credits clearly aren't enough.

Thanks to our carbon tax, almost 10% of new cars sales in BC are for hybrids/EVs and 80% of those are for BEVs. Still a long way to go, but it wasn't that long ago that that figure around 1%
Americans are wed to the monthly payment of the car loan, and they *really* don't like arithmetic. Talk about TCO goes in one ear and out the other.
2013 LEAF 'S' Model with QC & rear-view camera
Bought Jan 2017 from N. California
Two years in Colorado, now in NM
03/18: 58 Ahr, 28k miles
11/18: 56.16 Ahr, 30k miles
09/20: 54.3 Ahr; 38k miles
-----
2018 Tesla Model 3 LR, Delivered 6/2018

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