GRA
Posts: 12893
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
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Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Wed May 05, 2021 10:22 pm

New law reduces sales tax on hydrogen vehicle purchases in Washington
https://mynorthwest-com.cdn.ampproject. ... hington%2F

A bill to promote hydrogen-powered vehicles is now a state law.

“Giving residents more access to purchase greener vehicles is one more way we can work together to lower greenhouse gas impacts across the state,” Gov. Inslee said, as he signed the bill.

Senator Brad Hawkins sponsored the bill, SB 5000, which creates an eight-year statewide pilot project for the reduction of sales tax on purchases of fuel-cell electric vehicles. . . .

Hawkins’ hydrogen vehicle legislation had bipartisan support and nearly 30 co-sponsors. It passed the Senate 49-0 in March and the House of Representatives 93-4 on April 10.

In 2019, the state Legislature approved another bill sponsored by Hawkins that authorizes public utility districts to produce and sell “renewable hydrogen. . . .”

The Douglas County Public Utility District plans to use its surplus hydropower to do just that, creating renewable hydrogen from excess renewable hydropower and possibly building hydrogen fueling stations. The PUD’s hydrogen production facility near East Wenatchee is expected to be completed toward the end of this year.

The bill also extends an exemption on vehicle sales tax that those who purchase traditional electric vehicles receive, which Hawkins says will help establish parity between fuel-cell electric vehicles and plug-in electrics.

With the first hydrogen-fueling stations in Washington expected to be operational by 2022, the legislation will allow a total of 650 vehicles to receive a 50% sales tax exemption in fiscal years 2023 through 2029.

Hydrogen vehicles are newer to the market, but have shown promise in how quickly they refuel and the limited amount of infrastructure needed to get fuel to stations.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 12893
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Mon May 10, 2021 1:24 am

GCC:
New York State adjusts EV rebate program, adds $30M
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/0 ... serda.html

. . . The program is changing so that more rebates can be distributed throughout the market, with some rebate ranges being lowered to allow more New Yorkers to take advantage of the incentives. The program incentive levels for consumers will change starting 30 June 2021.

These changes include updated rebate levels to incentivize EVs with longer all-electric ranges and EVs with a base Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price of less than $42,000.

There are an increasing number and variety of EV models available, with more than 50 models currently available in New York, and of those models, 15 have a range of more than 200 miles and are eligible for the rebate.

Eligible vehicles under the Drive Clean Rebate include all-electric cars, plug-in hybrid electric cars, and fuel-cell-electric cars.

New rebate levels as of 30 June 2021 will be:

EV Range/Price Rebate
200 miles or more $2,000
40 - 199 miles $1,000
<40 miles $500
MSRP >$42,000 $500. . . .

New York State is also investing in the rapid build-out of its charging infrastructure with more than 7,000 charging stations currently installed statewide. The Charge Ready NY program provides $4,000 per charging port with an additional $500 per port for stations installed in disadvantaged communities and can be combined with New York State’s 50% tax credit for charging station installation to boost savings.

The additional Drive Clean Rebate funding comes from revenue generated through the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

LeftieBiker
Moderator
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Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Mon May 10, 2021 4:21 am

I got my 150 mile range Leaf just in time.
Brilliant Silver 2021 Leaf SV40 W/ Pro Pilot & Protection
2009 Vectrix VX-1 W/18 Leaf modules, & 2 lithium E-bicycles.
BAFX OBDII Dongle
PLEASE don't PM me with Leaf questions. Just post in the topic that seems most appropriate.

GRA
Posts: 12893
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Wed May 12, 2021 7:42 pm

California ban on gas-powered cars would rewrite plug-in hybrid rules
https://www-cnet-com.cdn.ampproject.org ... d-rules%2F

It seems plug-in hybrids have already started to fall out of favor with automakers as a potential zero-emissions vehicle solution, but they could become crucial to meet California's plan to end the sale of new cars powered by fossil fuels by 2035. Last week, the California Air Resources Board provided the first details of how it hopes to achieve this goal, and chief among the deets is a major rewrite of plug-in hybrid rules.

These changes come in the overarching way the state plans to achieve 100% zero-emission new car sales. As of now, California wants to implement an 80-20 mix where 80% of new cars sold will be totally electric or hydrogen-powered, and 20% may still feature a plug-in hybrid powertrain. Essentially, automakers will still be able to plop an engine under the hood come 2035.

However, PHEVs will need to follow far more stringent definitions of the powertrain. California wants any plug-in hybrid to achieve 50 miles of all-electric range to meet the categorization -- a huge ask. Only two plug-in hybrids in recent years meet that criteria: the Chevrolet Volt (no longer on sale) and the Polestar 1 (soon to exit production). To achieve such a lofty range, automakers need to fit larger batteries, and when you're talking about a big battery and an internal-combustion engine, things get complex (and costly) quickly.

But, that's not all the state will need. Future PHEVs to qualify under these regulations will need to be capable of driving under only electric power throughout their charged range. So, no software to flick on the engine for a few moments to recoup some lost energy. While these regulations would actually benefit drivers to shift PHEVs away from "compliance cars" to something far more usable, the complexities may just turn automakers to focus exclusively on EVs.

It all remains to be seen, however since the plans remain open for public comment until June 11 of this year. After that, the board will vote and
detail a full proposal later this year. We may also see updated and more stringent federal regulations influence the state's decision. The Biden administration will present new regulations by this July.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 12893
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Wed May 12, 2021 10:40 pm

GCR:
Minnesota adopting California electric car rules, will bring more EVs to Midwest

https://www.greencarreports.com/news/11 ... to-midwest

Minnesota could be the latest state—and the first in the Midwest—to adopt California's emissions rules, requiring greater fuel efficiency than federal standards.

Proposed in 2019, tougher emissions rules achieved a major breakthrough this week when an administrative law judge ruled that the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's rule-making process conformed to state law, removing one potential hurdle to adoption.

Dubbed Clean Cars Minnesota, the new rule would come into effect with the 2025 model year, but Republican lawmakers are working to slow down or halt the rule-making process, according to KARE 11 news.

Minnesota dealerships have opposed stricter emissions rules, claiming they will be saddled with unwanted electric cars. State lawmakers recently pushed for the adoption of a new tax on EVs to replace gas tax revenue.

Advocates, however, are enthusiastic about Clean Cars Minnesota precisely because it will prod automakers to bring more EVs to the state. Current estimates indicate the new emissions rules could eliminate 1 million tons of carbon emissions by 2030, the Sierra Club noted.

"For climate action, public health protection, and consumer choice, Minnesota becoming a clean cars state is a significant step with major benefits," Hieu Le, a representative of the Sierra Club's Clean Transportation for All campaign, said in a statement. . . .

If Clean Cars Minnesota is enacted, Minnesota would be the 15th state (plus the District of Columbia) to follow California's stricter emissions rules.

Meanwhile, California just last week announced a plan for vehicle emissions that includes new EV targets and would go into effect starting in 2026. . . .
Last edited by GRA on Fri May 14, 2021 6:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

rmay635703
Posts: 583
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2011 7:43 pm

Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Fri May 14, 2021 5:13 pm

You will get no complaints from me if a

Volt
ImpaVolt
Voltruk
Voltvan
Voltrax

End up on the market,
in places like I live with no public chargers and no superchargers have decent plug in hybrid options is only a good thing.

GRA
Posts: 12893
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Fri May 14, 2021 11:40 pm

GCC: See https://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic. ... 60#p602669 for background:
Washington governor vetoes legislation mandating all-electric new LDV sales by 2030
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/0 ... nslee.html

. . . The Clean Cars 2030 package passed the legislature as an amendment to E2SHB 1287—a bill mandating electric utility preparation for an all-EV future. Governor Inslee signed the bulk of 1287, vetoing the Clean Cars amendment package due to its linking electrification to the implementation of a road usage charge program.

In his veto statement, Governor Inslee said

The Clean Cars 2030 package passed the legislature as an amendment to E2SHB 1287—a bill mandating electric utility preparation for an all-EV future. Governor Inslee signed the bulk of 1287, vetoing the Clean Cars amendment package due to its linking electrification to the implementation of a road usage charge program.

In his veto statement, Governor Inslee said:

Section 6 of the bill [the Clean Cars package] ties a very important goal of electrifying our transportation sector to the implementation of a road usage charge program. Transportation is our state’s greatest source of carbon emissions and we cannot afford to link an important goal like getting to 100% zero-emission vehicles to a separate policy that will take time to design and implement.

The Clean Cars 2030 legislation would have set a goal for the state that all publicly owned and privately owned passenger and light duty vehicles of model year 2030 or later that are sold, purchased, or registered in Washington state be electric vehicles—once the road usage charge (or tax based on vehicle miles traveled or equivalent charge) was in effect in the state with at least 75% of registered LDVs participating.

Matthew Metz, founder and co-executive director of Coltura, an organization that had championed Clean Cars 2030, said that Coltura will continue to work with the governor’s office to advance vehicle electrification policy in the state.

After the dust settles from this legislative session, we hope the governor will consider setting a goal by executive order for all new vehicles to be electric by 2030.

—Matthew Metz. . . .
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

GRA
Posts: 12893
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Sat Jun 05, 2021 5:16 pm

The fastest way to get more people to buy electric vehicles

America’s EV charging station infrastructure is woefully lacking.
https://www-vox-com.cdn.ampproject.org/ ... astructure

. . . There are currently about 42,490 public charging EV stations in the US, counting Level 2 chargers (taking about an hour of charging for 10 to 20 miles of range), and DC Fast chargers (taking about 20 minutes of charging for 60 to 80 miles of range). In comparison, there are about 115,000 gas stations in the US, most of which have multiple pumps.

Biden’s plan would increase the number of charging stations more than tenfold by establishing grant and incentive programs for state and local governments and private companies to build 500,000 charging stations around America’s highways and in hard-to-reach communities by the year 2030. With a number of US carmakers pledging to go totally electric by 2035, that buildout could make EV charging ports as ubiquitous as gas pumps.

At the moment, there aren’t enough reliable charging stations to accommodate a sudden increase in EV usage. About 627,000 plug-in EVs were bought in 2019 and 2020, and demand is expected to increase — especially as carmakers phase out gas-powered cars.

“We’re so much better off than we were even five years ago ... but we still have a huge gap,” a Biden administration official told Vox. “This is an essential piece of the shift to EVs and it’s not going to happen on its own. . . .”

Getting EV charging stations to be as ubiquitous as gas stations would help change that, but it’s just one piece of the puzzle. Even more important is increasing the availability and access for home and work charging stations — where experts believe most people will ultimately charge their cars.

“Home charging is the most important; that’s where the highest number of charging [stations] will be needed,” said Scott Hardman, a researcher studying hybrids and EVs at the University of California Davis Institute of Transportation Studies. “It’s the cheapest; it’s the most convenient.”

In addition to building public charging stations, the Biden administration plans to propose expanding tax credits for private infrastructure for home EV chargers, giving people an incentive to install them. This is key, experts told me; making charging station access equitable — ensuring they are affordable and accessible — is as important as increasing the total number of charging stations. . . .

More rapid charging technology is being developed, but the vast majority of available public charging stations currently in the US are the more sluggish Level 2 chargers, which require far more time to get to a full charge. There are just 5,141 DC Fast chargers in the US, with big gaps in parts of the Midwest and Mountain West, according to the Energy Department’s map of charging stations.

“If your battery’s down to 20 percent, you’re going to have to stay plugged in for hours and hours,” said Ellen Hughes-Cromwick, the former chief global economist at Ford Motor Company, now a senior resident fellow at Third Way.

The lack of charging infrastructure can mean headaches for drivers going on road trips, who need to plan their route to hit available charging stations. An October 2020 poll from YouGov found that charging time, hassle of charging, and cost of charging at home were all top reasons buyers who were looking for a new car weren’t considering an electric vehicle. . . .

Competition and congestion around EV charging stations has gotten particularly bad in cities like San Francisco, where there’s a growing number of electric car drivers. (The places with the highest density of charging stations per 100,000 people are Vermont, California, Colorado, Hawaii, and Washington, DC.)

“In San Francisco, there’s a huge congestion problem, and there are simply not enough plugs for EVs in that metro area,” said Hughes-Cromwick. “There is congestion in areas where EV demand has flourished. If we don’t get going on this, we will have roadblocks, especially for longer trips. . . .”

Home charging may be the most convenient, but home charging is also typically relegated to higher-income people who can actually afford to charge from within their home. For lower-income people who don’t have a garage or a dedicated parking spot with easy access to a charger, the logistics of charging at home become much more complicated.

Just as policymakers are figuring out how to make EVs cheaper, experts told me that any expansion of charging stations needs to focus on how to make home charging more equitable and accessible for middle- and lower-income people.

One option is getting more charging stations on residential streets, powered by the same electrical lines for street lights. This was piloted in London in 2020, with a number of street lights converted. But this is a relatively small project, and it hasn’t been adopted widely yet in other countries. Another option is increasing the number of charging stations at people’s workplaces, giving them another place to charge while their car is parked for hours.

“Everyone parks their car somewhere at night; that’s where we need to get the charging to,” said Hardman. “We have to be careful it’s not just the privileged households that get the lower running costs.”

The Biden administration official told Vox that the president’s infrastructure plan is proposing an extended or expanded tax credit to expand private infrastructure like charging stations at home. . . .

There seems to be little hope of this passing, bar the Dems-only reconciliation route.

Given the size of the EV expansion desired, the vast majority of those 500k chargers need to be QCs, because with a need to replace and provide charging for 270 million cars, L2 is almost meaningless, even when you subtract the households that already can or can be easily modified to L2 at home. You still need to provide home/work L2 in addition to those 500k QCs.
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

WetEV
Posts: 4383
Joined: Fri May 04, 2012 8:25 am
Delivery Date: 16 Feb 2014
Location: Near Seattle, WA

Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Sat Jun 05, 2021 9:38 pm

GRA wrote:
Sat Jun 05, 2021 5:16 pm
a need to replace and provide charging for 270 million cars
How far in the future?

Electric car sales are doubling every 2-3 years, and will take a about a decade to be the majority of cars sold. Add about another decade to get to half of the cars on the road. Maybe a decade or even two before almost all cars are electric. Depending on the future of mass transportation, not clear to me at least that there will every be 270 million electric cars.

The issue isn't building charging right now for all the cars being electric 40 years from now, it is building more charging as more cars are on the road.
WetEV
#49
Most everything around here is wet during the rainy season. And the rainy season is long.
2012 Leaf SL Red (Totaled)
2014 Leaf SL Red
2019 eTron Blue

GRA
Posts: 12893
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 1:49 pm
Location: East side of San Francisco Bay

Re: Government subsidies/perks/mandates for EVs

Mon Jun 07, 2021 4:55 pm

WetEV wrote:
Sat Jun 05, 2021 9:38 pm
GRA wrote:
Sat Jun 05, 2021 5:16 pm
a need to replace and provide charging for 270 million cars
How far in the future?

Electric car sales are doubling every 2-3 years, and will take a about a decade to be the majority of cars sold. Add about another decade to get to half of the cars on the road. Maybe a decade or even two before almost all cars are electric. Depending on the future of mass transportation, not clear to me at least that there will every be 270 million electric cars.

The issue isn't building charging right now for all the cars being electric 40 years from now, it is building more charging as more cars are on the road.

Consider that we sell an average of say 17 million LDVs in the U.S. each year. Last year 252,548 BEVs were sold in the U.S., so 500k L2s (over a period of several years) covers less than 2 years of sales if there's absolutely no increase, and we expect and need to see a big increase. If we take 130 million as the number of U.S. households in 2020 (estimated to be 132 million at end of 2021) and assume per the Plug-in America survey that 56% of them can charge at home (which probably means L1 without electrical work), that's 72.8 million, leaving 57.2 million who can't charge and who most need charging given where they're likely to live, and the higher pollution levels they face. As I wrote, 500k, if L2, is a drop in the bucket, given that each L2 is occupied for 8+ hours to fully charge a BEV (we'll assume going forward that all future BEV sales will have 1 week's range in routine use, and I'm ignoring PHEV usage).

OTOH, 500k QCs get's us up in the same order of magnitude as the number of gas pumps. Of course, it takes much longer to charge than it does to fill a tank, but at least there's room for significant expansion of numbers much more quickly than the decades before we can possibly retrofit every existing MUD and curbside space with L2. We have some idea of what curbside spaces cost, as Quebec just decided to subsidize 4500 dual curbside EVSEs:
"To support this important initiative, a grant program is being offered exclusively to municipalities, through which Hydro-Québec is providing financial assistance of up to $12,000 [CDN, about $9,928 U.S.) per standard charging station.

Charging stations must meet one of the following charging needs:

Overnight charging in neighborhoods where electric vehicle owners do not have access to private outdoor outlets
Daytime charging downtown and near shops

In addition, the municipality must allow access to the curbside station 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and offer free parking in front of the curbside station from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m."
https://insideevs.com/news/511091/quebe ... ts-coming/


Note that they only need to complete by 2028. We don't know if that covers the entire cost of the station; almost certainly not given the "financial assistance" statement, but let's assume that it does. As I've previously mentioned, the city of San Francisco alone has something over 200k curbside parking spaces, but let's call it 200k to make the math easy, and round the cost per EVSE up to $5,000 for the same reason (x2 per station = $10k). So, to cover every curbside parking space in San Francisco, that's $1 billion in current-year dollars. As San Francisco's annual budget for this (Covid) fiscal year is $13.7 billion, and is forecast to be $12.6 billion next fiscal year, as you can see we're talking an extremely hefty chunk of change even spread over a period of years, and that's for one wealthy U.S. city (with a very high take rate of PEVs).
Guy [I have lots of experience designing/selling off-grid AE systems, some using EVs but don't own one. Local trips are by foot, bike and/or rapid transit].

The 'best' is the enemy of 'good enough'. Copper shot, not Silver bullets.

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