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Re: California retail H2 fuel stations

Posted: Thu Sep 05, 2019 5:57 pm
by GRA
GCR:
Northern California fuell-cell drivers still left dry since June explosion
https://www.greencarreports.com/news/11 ... -explosion

. . . many of the region’s hundreds of hydrogen fuel-cell-car drivers have been left with no reasonable choice but to park their cars until fuel supplies returned. . . .

Air Products issued a statement Aug. 30, saying company “has completed all actions…preventive and corrective measures in readiness to fully resume fueling activies.”

“At this time, we are awaiting further inspections and direction from the [Santa Clara Fire Department] to be able to resume fueling and return to full operations,” the company reported. . . .

They're trucking fuel in from Socal and there are still some stations open, as I saw a Clarity FCEV driving around just yesterday, but naturally there has been a complete halt in new station openings while there's almost no fuel for the existing ones.

Re: California retail H2 fuel stations

Posted: Sat Sep 21, 2019 2:13 pm
by GRA
GCC:
10th retail hydrogen station opens in SF Bay area
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2019/0 ... 21-h2.html


Oakland, CA. This is the first of First Element's new stations using liquid H2 delivery and storage, with a capacity of 808 kg, two dispensers with three nozzles (2 @ 700bar, 1 @ 350bar). Air Products must have gotten their production facility repaired, or else they're trucking H2 in from SoCal.

Re: California retail H2 fuel stations

Posted: Sat Sep 21, 2019 2:15 pm
by GRA
Didn't see an announcement for this in July, but here it is:
2019 Annual Evaluation of
Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle
Deployment & Hydrogen Fuel
Station Network Development
https://ww2.arb.ca.gov/sites/default/fi ... _Final.pdf

Re: California retail H2 fuel stations

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 4:54 pm
by GRA
GCC:
First of three hydrogen stations in San Francisco opens; 100% renewable H2
https://www.greencarcongress.com/2019/1 ... -sfh2.html


This is the second Shell station to open in Norcal, and makes 12 open in the Bay Area (Emeryville is apparently being upgraded and so isn't open) and #42 total. Capacity is 513 kg. and there are two dispensers.

Re: California retail H2 fuel stations

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:56 pm
by Oilpan4
The petrochemical companies are the best suited for the large scale manufacture, handling and transportation of hydrogen since they have making it for at least 70 years.

How much does it cost to fuel a car with this exotic reform of natural gas?

Re: California retail H2 fuel stations

Posted: Sun Nov 10, 2019 4:12 pm
by GRA
Do you mean what the price of the H2 is? That varies from station to station just like gasoline, but it remains uncompetitive with gasoline for now, which is why the FCEV manufacturers subsidize three years worth. My closest True Zero station was $16.78/kg., but I haven't been by in some time so I suppose that might have changed, although the shortages of H2 from the Air Products production facility back in June are apparently still affecting the supply. The station at Toyota HQ in San Ramon was over $20/kg. when it opened, but I have no idea what it is now. Lowest price I ever saw advertised was $9.99/kg. for six Air Products-owned (IIRR) stations in SoCal, but I think they've raised them since.

The relevant page on California H2 prices from the CAFCP website states:
Hydrogen fuel prices range from $12.85 to more than $16 per kilogram (kg), but the most common price is $13.99 per kg (equivalent on a price per energy basis to $5.60 per gallon of gasoline), which translates to an operating cost of $0.21 per mile. . . .

At $3.50 per gallon gasoline, a conventional vehicle costs about $0.13 per mile to operate, while an FCEV using $8 per kg hydrogen fuel would cost about $0.12 per mile.
https://cafcp.org/content/cost-refill

As that data is based on a 2015 DoE report, i wouldn't put a lot of weight on it for current prices. The larger, 2nd gen retail stations like the Shell one in San Francisco that are now opening cost less to build per kg./H2 capacity, so they should allow lower prices.