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Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 9:34 am
by ahagge
Fees for Level 2 EV charging stations owned by Blink and operated on the Blink Network in kWh eligible states will range from $0.39 to $0.79 per kWh, depending on the state and individual’s membership status. Fees for DCFC chargers owned by Blink and operated on the Blink Network in kWh eligible state will range from $0.49 to $0.69 per kWh, depending on the state and individual’s membership status.
Let's see - some perspective - 1 gallon of gasoline has roughly 33.7 kWh (per the EPA), so...

- L2 charging: $13.14 to $26.62 per gallon equivalent
- L3 charging: $16.51 to $23.25 per gallon equivalent

OPEC has nothing on these guys! :roll:

Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 10:33 am
by Nekota
Using the calculation of energy content seems misleading to me since this calculation omits the heat engine losses compared to the losses in an electrical motor. If you use the max cost of $0.79 per kwhr and a typical 4 miles/kwhr the cost becomes $0.20 per mile which is on par with the gas cost of $4.00/gal and 20 mpg giving $0.20 per mile for gas.
ahagge wrote:
Fees for Level 2 EV charging stations owned by Blink and operated on the Blink Network in kWh eligible states will range from $0.39 to $0.79 per kWh, depending on the state and individual’s membership status. Fees for DCFC chargers owned by Blink and operated on the Blink Network in kWh eligible state will range from $0.49 to $0.69 per kWh, depending on the state and individual’s membership status.
Let's see - some perspective - 1 gallon of gasoline has roughly 33.7 kWh (per the EPA), so...

- L2 charging: $13.14 to $26.62 per gallon equivalent
- L3 charging: $16.51 to $23.25 per gallon equivalent

OPEC has nothing on these guys! :roll:

Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 11:21 am
by walterbays
JPWhite wrote:I see the need for public charging diminishing as better EV's come to market. This will be especially true for L2 public charging stations. Longer range EV's should hopefully increase demand for rapid charging.
Even with current EV's I think that adequate QC infrastructure greatly diminishes the need for public L2. I used 45 minutes of Blink L2 recently on a long distance day, for the first time in months. It was only because it happened to be available right at my destination, and the couple of kWh's I got were useful only in giving me a little more flexibility to choose among different QC locations on my way back depending on circumstances.

Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 11:24 am
by TomT
Exactly! When I have to charge away from home, I seek out QCs... L2 is just too much of a nuisance on many levels...
walterbays wrote:Even with current EV's I think that adequate QC infrastructure greatly diminishes the need for public L2. I used 45 minutes of Blink L2 recently on a long distance day, for the first time in months. It was only because it happened to be available right at my destination, and the couple of kWh's I got were useful only in giving me a little more flexibility to choose among different QC locations on my way back depending on circumstances.

Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 11:52 am
by pkulak
TomT wrote:Exactly! When I have to charge away from home, I seek out QCs... L2 is just too much of a nuisance on many levels...
Well, when there's a charger at your destination, that's as good as (or better than) a quick charger 2 miles away. I go to Salem a lot, and there are chargers all over the downtown area. I'm usually there for more than 2 hours, which is enough time to get me from 30% back to 100% for the drive home. The only thing that makes that trip different than if I used a gasser is the reserved parking space.

Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 12:00 pm
by johnrhansen
I think my days of charging away from home are numbered. I charge at home mostly anyway. Just too expensive. If it costs the same as driving a small ice car, why not drive a small ice car and not worry about the range restrictions?

Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 12:03 pm
by pkulak
johnrhansen wrote:I think my days of charging away from home are numbered. I charge at home mostly anyway. Just too expensive. If it costs the same as driving a small ice car, why not drive a small ice car and not worry about the range restrictions?
Because I don't want to own two cars?

Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 12:52 pm
by Stanton
When are people going realize that public charging is not a viable business? How is raising the hourly rate going to entice more people to charge?! I'm amazed that NON-EV owners continue to site "lack of public charging" as a barrier to EV ownership when most EV owners don't even use it (charge @home)!

Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 1:02 pm
by KeiJidosha
79¢/kWh for <4kW delivery is a premium price for an inferior product. On top of poor reliability, slow delivery, unreliable touchscreens, unreadable displays, overheating connectors, unhelpful infomatics, and no price incentives to encourage availability, this will stay my charge site of last resort.

Re: Blink changes billing model for public charging

Posted: Tue Sep 02, 2014 1:15 pm
by JPWhite
Stanton wrote:I'm amazed that NON-EV owners continue to site "lack of public charging" as a barrier to EV ownership when most EV owners don't even use it (charge @home)!
I'm reminded of the countless times Mark Chatterley of Transport Evolved has lamented that a primary reason we need public charging is to convince non-EV drivers to drive an EV. EV drivers use the stations sparingly (Last month I spent $7 with Blink, several of those charging sessions were optional, I did so to support the network).

One reason is the misconception you have to have a 'special charging station'. Folks are simply amazed when I tell them you can charge using a regular 120v outlet with the cord set that came with the car if that's all you have available. Therefore in their minds one must need the equivalent of gas pumps all over the place, also a throw back to their current fueling behavior.

My amazement was the exact opposite when I researched getting a LEAF. I was dismayed you couldn't just get an electrician to run a 240v outlet into your garage and plug in. (Thanks to Phil in CA we can now, but initially that wasn't an option).