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paulgipe
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Joined: Sat Aug 02, 2014 4:23 pm
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Location: Bakersfield, CA 93305
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2021 Update on Non-Tesla DC Fast Charging Station Density in North America: Oklahoma on Top--Maybe

Wed Mar 17, 2021 10:48 am

My, my, how things change. I’ve been tracking non-Tesla DCFC station density for the past three years as a prod for the Golden State to get its act together. See Update on Non-Tesla DC Fast Charging Station Density in North America (2020), and California Lags in DC Fast-Charging Station Density for Electric Vehicles (2018).

We like to think we’re the greenest of the green here. My point was we weren’t. We’d fallen behind the Canadians—yes, the Canadian provinces of Quebec and British Columbia in the Great White North.

Finally, Electrify America and California brought on line a string of stations that I’d been waiting for. The state program was a nearly five-year long wait, but their stations are now up and running and I can get to where I want to go. So I had little interest in examining station density again. Been there, done that.

That is, until the Wall Street Journal called.

I don’t get many calls from the Journal and I don’t bother to answer all of those. This call was from the news side and they wanted to talk about DCFC station density. Now I was on the hook.

While I was talking to the reporter I thought I should pull up the numbers and see if my rankings had changed. Sure enough California had moved up from fourth place to second place behind Quebec. (Those Canadians again.) That slew of new stations in the California Energy Commission’s program had made a difference.

Well, it was the Journal and a lot of people still read it so I thought maybe I should do the whole table over again. There might be other changes worthy of the Journal’s attention.

While I spend a lot of times with spreadsheets, I am not an Excel jockey. (I don’t even use Excel.) I am sure there’s a way to take all the data from the Alternative Fuels Data Center and sort it to get what I want. Or I could find a human at NREL to do it for me. (The National Renewable Energy Laboratory manages the Data Center for DOE.) But I didn’t want to take the time to either learn Excel or wade through voice mail hell to find a human at NREL.

So I looked at all the states and provinces I’d done before. That much I can do. Then I pulled up PlugShare and looked for concentrations of DCFC stations across the continent. That’s when something popped up that I wasn’t expecting.

Image

What were all those orange markers in the middle of the country? As I drilled down it looked like they were concentrated in . . . Oklahoma. What the?

Oklahoma! The oil & gas state that gave birth to fracking king Aubrey McClendon and the climate change-denying US Senator James Inhofe had a slug of DCFC stations strung out along major highways. Surprisingly, they weren’t all concentrated in Oklahoma City or Tulsa.

Sure enough when I pulled up the numbers Oklahoma topped the list in ports or as NREL calls them “outlets” relative to population.

Image

Unfortunately, this data has been less than reliable in the past. Some networks were double counting ports. NREL had promised to correct the problem last year. And when I examined stations that had been at issue, the problem seemed to have been corrected—or so I thought.

I drilled down to the networks in Oklahoma. The bulk of the stations in the state were installed by Francis Energy using a state program originally intended to aid natural gas fueling stations. Previously unknown in the EV world, Francis Energy had made its name in oil & gas. Now they were staking out turf in the rapidly evolving world of fast charging.

Drilling down further, I looked at a Francis’ station in Tulsa. AFDC says their Reasor station has seven ports. There are only six kiosks or dispensers at this site according to PlugShare. Each has two cables but can only charge one car at a time. The data was off, but not by much.

I then looked at sites elsewhere. PlugShare shows that the Francis station at Westminster Village in Oklahoma City has only four kiosks. However, AFDC reports eight ports at this site. That’s clearly wrong.

Then I tried the Hilton Garden Inn in Lawton. PlugShare reports that this site has eight kiosks. AFDC lists this site having 16 ports.

There’s obviously a problem either with NREL’s data analysis or with the data submitted by Francis Energy.

Image

The continuing problem with AFDC’s listing of port density requires us to revert to the less representative measure of station density. This substantially changes the ranking.

Oklahoma, because of Francis Energy’s network, is now in the top five. California falls to fifth place from fourth in 2020.

Canadian provinces again top the list. This time New Brunswick has beat out neighboring Quebec. British Columbia has fallen to sixth place. Ontario has fallen out of the top ten as Doug Ford’s anti-EV efforts have begun to bite.

Oregon continues in the top five. Washington State has fallen out of the top five but remains in the top ten.

In contrast to leaders like California and New Brunswick that have 30 to 50 stations per million people, laggards like Pennsylvania have barely five stations per million people. New Brunswick has ten times the station density as the Keystone state.

What’s with those Canadians anyway? Don’t they know EVs don’t work in the cold. . .

Update on Non-Tesla DC Fast Charging Station Density in North America (2020)
California Lags in DC Fast-Charging Station Density for Electric Vehicles (2018)

Paul Gipe
Bakersfield, California
2017 Bolt LT with DCFC, leased 11/09/17
2015 Nissan S with QC, leased, returned
2013 Chevy Volt Premium, used 10/3/16, sold
http://www.wind-works.org

frontrangeleaf
Posts: 176
Joined: Sat Aug 03, 2019 10:07 am
Delivery Date: 08 Jul 2019
Location: Denver Area

Re: 2021 Update on Non-Tesla DC Fast Charging Station Density in North America: Oklahoma on Top--Maybe

Wed Mar 17, 2021 11:41 am

Great stuff, thanks Paul.

The challenges with non-Tesla charging networks remain a major obstacle to broader EV adoption for use cases beyond charge-at-home for many people.

We have never charged our Leaf SL+ away from home, and never expect to. We'll sell the car first. It doesn't have enough highway range or charge fast enough absent a TMS to make over-the-road travel a practical option.

Yes it's possible, no I'm not willing to work that hard at it. It does have more than enough range to make any urban corridor trip convenient and hassle-free. We think of it as an "urban corridor runabout."

-b
Empty-nesters - NW Denver-Boulder Area

2019 Leaf SL Plus
2015 Audi Q5 TDI
2007 BMW Z4 3.0Si
2012 VW GTI: SOLD

webeleafowners
Posts: 1211
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 5:37 pm
Delivery Date: 06 Oct 2015
Location: Okanagan Valley British Columbia

Re: 2021 Update on Non-Tesla DC Fast Charging Station Density in North America: Oklahoma on Top--Maybe

Wed Mar 17, 2021 2:50 pm

I think this year you’ll see BC make up some ground. They got a lot of stations partially installed before winter hit. The corridor to Prince Rupert should be done this year. And the corridor through Prince George east to Alberta should also see some additional charge stations. The kootenays is filling in slowly. Our little town of Vernon is supposed to see another BC hydro station this year although no location has been selected. We are also on the coming soon list for a Supercharger...so next 10 years. :).
2020 Model 3 Tesla. AWD with FSD. Deep metallic blue. Our daily driver.
2016 Nissan Leaf SV 30KWh Culis Red. Sold. Was my daily driver. Loved that car.
EV only Family...well except for the big diesel motorhome. :shock:

SageBrush
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Re: 2021 Update on Non-Tesla DC Fast Charging Station Density in North America: Oklahoma on Top--Maybe

Wed Mar 17, 2021 4:14 pm

webeleafowners wrote:
Wed Mar 17, 2021 2:50 pm
We are also on the coming soon list for a Supercharger...so next 10 years. :).
Don't be so peevish. Five years should do it ;)

Joking aside, Tesla had growing pains in its transition to V3 superchargers but now with lots of cash and a factory spitting out hardware they are picking up the pace and expanding their plans. I have my fingers crossed that my most wished for location will come online this year.
2013 LEAF 'S' Model with QC & rear-view camera
Bought Jan 2017 from N. California
Two years in Colorado, now in NM
03/18: 58 Ahr, 28k miles
11/18: 56.16 Ahr, 30k miles
09/20: 54.3 Ahr; 38k miles
-----
2018 Tesla Model 3 LR, Delivered 6/2018

DougWantsALeaf
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Re: 2021 Update on Non-Tesla DC Fast Charging Station Density in North America: Oklahoma on Top--Maybe

Wed Mar 17, 2021 5:09 pm

Oklahoma was where I heard via reddit there is a Leaf (Plus) based taxi company. The Plus appears to do fine as a cab, as 1 DC charge a day generally suffices. That also matches what the Indy uber drive with well over 100k miles (on a Plus) mentions. Tied with low operating and repair costs, large-ish boot and it would seem to serve well for a few years.
2019 S Plus (93.86% SOH) & 2019 SV Plus (93.35% SOH) Both Silver
2013 Leaf SV sold 2019 with 11 bars
100 Mile Club Member (Number 87)
Max Miles on 13 Leaf: 120 miles
Max Miles on 19 SV+: 242 Highway miles @ 4.5 miles/kWh

webeleafowners
Posts: 1211
Joined: Mon Oct 05, 2015 5:37 pm
Delivery Date: 06 Oct 2015
Location: Okanagan Valley British Columbia

Re: 2021 Update on Non-Tesla DC Fast Charging Station Density in North America: Oklahoma on Top--Maybe

Wed Mar 17, 2021 8:08 pm

SageBrush wrote:
Wed Mar 17, 2021 4:14 pm
webeleafowners wrote:
Wed Mar 17, 2021 2:50 pm
We are also on the coming soon list for a Supercharger...so next 10 years. :).
Don't be so peevish. Five years should do it ;)

Joking aside, Tesla had growing pains in its transition to V3 superchargers but now with lots of cash and a factory spitting out hardware they are picking up the pace and expanding their plans. I have my fingers crossed that my most wished for location will come online this year.
Heh heh. Yah I hear ya. The site we want to open is Osoyoos. Border city they will be super handy for our trips to SoCal. It’ll happen. The province put a couple Chademo/CCS stations in there last fall but would be nice to have a V3 location.
2020 Model 3 Tesla. AWD with FSD. Deep metallic blue. Our daily driver.
2016 Nissan Leaf SV 30KWh Culis Red. Sold. Was my daily driver. Loved that car.
EV only Family...well except for the big diesel motorhome. :shock:

GiantTortoise
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Re: 2021 Update on Non-Tesla DC Fast Charging Station Density in North America: Oklahoma on Top--Maybe

Thu Mar 18, 2021 7:39 am

As an Oklahoman, the Francis Energy network seemed to come out of nowhere. But it's amazing. You can't really drive more than 50 miles on the highway without running into a Francis Energy charger. And they are usually working. In my experience, more reliable than the Electrify America stations in the state, anyway.

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