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Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Mon Jun 03, 2013 5:55 am
by caross
I'm about to have a Type 2 installed here at the house...

Was looking for input on model preferences. Anybody have any recommendations?

If there is already a post on this, please feel free to point me there. I'm relatively new here and learning my way around.

Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Mon Jun 03, 2013 3:19 pm
by planet4ever
caross wrote:I'm about to have a Type 2 installed here at the house...
Actually, the correct terminology is "Level 2", often called L2.
caross wrote:Was looking for input on model preferences. Anybody have any recommendations? If there is already a post on this, please feel free to point me there.
Thousands of them, probably! There are quite a few in this thread. First decide how fast you need to be able to charge the car at home. For many people the answer is "overnight". If so, any L2 EVSE will work. Some others, like Redjr who posted earlier in this thread, can save money if they charge in a short window, so would want nothing less than a 30A EVSE. The second consideration is the electrical capacity of your home, and you will probably need an electrician to analyze that for you. In a few cases it may cost thousands of dollars to upgrade your system for a high amperage EVSE (you need a 40A circuit for a 30A EVSE), while you could install a lower power unit for far less (a 16A EVSE can run on a 20A circuit).

Once you have decided on EVSE amperage, then you can start comparing models, their features, perceived quality, and price.

Ray

Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 4:46 pm
by caross
Thanks. Level2 it is. :) I have finally started to use EVSE and not "charger". Always new terminology within new segments of technology.

We just built a house with lots of "green" (I hate that overloaded term) features. One being a 6.6kWh photo voltaic solar array on the roof. At that time I had expected that I would be getting an EV and had them run a 8-2 50A wire to the garage on a dedicated 40A circuit breaker. It is terminated in the garage as a 50A socket.

I have been looking around at various options on Amazon and found quite a few GE, Seimens, AV, Levitron, as well as a few other names I have not ever heard of.

It was my understanding that Level 2 EVSE was in the range of 4hrs for a 2013 Leaf - so I suppose that would be my charging time. I have already figured out how to have the Leaf "charging timer" set for when "the sun is on" :)

I suppose what I was after was the opinion of people that have model XXX or manufacturer YYY. Often times you hear that one has issues and is not worth the price, etc.

Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 5:43 pm
by KillaWhat
I have a Nissan labelled Aeronvironment EVSE, and one of the not brand new model Blink's.
(and an EVSE upgraded to Level 2)

The new Blink / Bosch / Delta units look really nice, but no performance data available yet.
The price sure is right.
I prefer the look of the Blink version of the new unit.
If I were starting from scratch, I'd get one of the New Blinks, and an EVSE upgrade.

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As far as your PV array, and setting charging timers for during sunlight, I assume that you are "grid Tied" and that shouldn't make charge time as relevant.

I'd love to see the solar install sometime.
I'm dying to do one (didn't want to do it the same tax year as the Car :roll: )
And was hoping PA would "find" their subsidy funds again.

Image

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Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 6:17 pm
by QueenBee
caross wrote:It was my understanding that Level 2 EVSE was in the range of 4hrs for a 2013 Leaf - so I suppose that would be my charging time. I have already figured out how to have the Leaf "charging timer" set for when "the sun is on" :)
.
You have TOU metering out there? I assume you have net metering right?

We don't here but with or without I think the optimal charge timer setting is to charge at night so that the car completes before you need it and before peak power usage. By charging during outside peak times you can optimize your impact on the grid. The idea being that the grid's base generation is greener than what is needed to handle peak loads.

By using just an end timer you also keep the battery at an average lower SOC which helps with degradation caused by storing the batteries at a high SOC.

Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 10:16 pm
by Ingineer
For all people considering the EVSE Upgrade; we now stock most common outlet adapters, so in a lot of cases it's a simple plug-n-play operation. Even if you go with another unit for home charging, the upgrade makes a great back-up unit as well as being portable. Get the NEMA 14-50 adapter with your upgrade, and you can swing into almost any RV park and grab a charge!

Most homes also have a dryer outlet, so in a pinch you can grab a quick level 2 boost with a simple dryer adapter.

If you already have a Blink unit, and it's plug-connected, all you need is the 6-50 adapter, and you have a simple plug-in backup should your blink ever be on the blink!

-Phil

Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 11:14 pm
by TomHuffman
Ingineer wrote:Most homes also have a dryer outlet, so in a pinch you can grab a quick level 2 boost with a simple dryer adapter.
This dryer adapter will not fit the receptacle on any house built after 2000. Newer houses require a four-prong plug for the dryer.

http://homerenovations.about.com/od/ele ... outlet.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 11:25 pm
by TonyWilliams
TomHuffman wrote:
Ingineer wrote:Most homes also have a dryer outlet, so in a pinch you can grab a quick level 2 boost with a simple dryer adapter.
This dryer adapter will not fit the receptacle on any house built after 2000. Newer houses require a four-prong plug for the dryer.

http://homerenovations.about.com/od/ele ... outlet.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Yes, those newer dryers are NEMA 14-30, however if you have a 14-50, just remove the bottom fourth "neutral" pin. Now, it can be used in both.

NOTE: DANGER, DANGER, WILL BURN DOWN YOUR HOUSE WARNING !!! If you have a Tesla or Rav4 EV Gen II, those cars can exceed 24 amps (80% of 30 amp circuit), and therefore you could inadvertently plug a modified 14-50 into a 14-30 and pull too many amps.

If you have anything that uses Tesla chargers (Roadster, Model S/X, and Toyota Rav4 EV Gen II), I do not recommend modifying the connector unless you actually know what you are doing. For LEAF and other EV's currently on the market, it's not a problem; modify away!! They can't pull more than 30 amps.

Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2013 11:30 pm
by Ingineer
TomHuffman wrote:This dryer adapter will not fit the receptacle on any house built after 2000. Newer houses require a four-prong plug for the dryer.

http://homerenovations.about.com/od/ele ... outlet.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
I can assure you this is not a hard rule. Even though NEC grounding requirements want to see a NEMA 14-30 outlet for the dryer, many contractors still install 10-30's. Even so, I'd say over 90% of our customers have homes older than 2000.

That being said, we will soon have the 14-30 adapter in stock as well. In a pinch you can simply saw off the bottom prong (neutral) from our 14-50 adapter and it will then fit 14-30, 14-50, and 14-60 outlets and operate safely.

-Phil

Re: EVSE options for 2013 Leaf

Posted: Wed Jun 05, 2013 5:46 am
by KillaWhat
https://www.blinknetwork.com/chargers-residential.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;