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Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Sun Oct 27, 2019 4:11 pm
by WetEV
coulomb wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 3:43 pm
WetEV wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 3:17 pm
So 40Wh / 700W = 57 hours.
Did you mean 40 kWh?
Yes. Corrected.

Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Sun Oct 27, 2019 5:33 pm
by Oilpan4
Mines a 24kwh.

Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Sun Oct 27, 2019 6:26 pm
by WetEV
Oilpan4 wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 5:33 pm
Mines a 24kwh.
12 bars?
So you can idle for about 25 hours. Without worrying about carbon monoxide.
And you could drive over 100 miles at 35 MPH or less.
Or split that and drive over 50 miles taking 12 hours to do so.
Best speed for range, with no climate control, is 12 MPH.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/wczgxhs5e91i7 ... on7G93.pdf

Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 2:10 am
by cwerdna
cwerdna wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 9:46 am
LTLFTcomposite wrote:
Sun Oct 27, 2019 5:37 am
cwerdna wrote:
Thu Oct 24, 2019 8:03 pm
I won't even be in town. I get on a plane to Japan on Sunday morning.
So you're the one causing all this climate change :-D
...
LOL on the first part. So, power went out Saturday at ~8:20 pm. Unfortunately, Comcrap didn't stay up long this time. It went out before the 30 minute mark. (My cable modem and access point are on UPSes.) During the last PSPS, Comcrap stayed up for over 45 minutes.
...
I'm waiting at the airport now w/a 2 hour delayed flight. It sounds like the all clear for my area is Monday at 8 am but it sounds like it's for the weather event. They still need to inspect/finish inspections of the power lines before they turn power back on. So, it could be that day or another day. And, if there's damage, that needs to be fixed.
From what I can tell, power was restored on Monday (10/28) by around 7 pm. I was already well out of the country.

To top things off, PG&E was warning there might be another shutdown Tuesday (10/29) , possibly before power would be restored in some places or that it might be restored for not even a full day before another PSPS. But, it didn't affect my area.

Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 11:30 am
by DaveinOlyWA
Just saw the Netflix special on "Fire in Paradise" and it was very scary. If you aren't into it, then I strongly suggest to you fast forward to the last 5 minutes of the show (its only 40 mins long) where a firefighter talks about how he is seeing an escalating severity to the fires and says we no longer have the ability to effectively fight them any more.

Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 4:16 pm
by Oilpan4
DaveinOlyWA wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 11:30 am
Just saw the Netflix special on "Fire in Paradise" and it was very scary. If you aren't into it, then I strongly suggest to you fast forward to the last 5 minutes of the show (its only 40 mins long) where a firefighter talks about how he is seeing an escalating severity to the fires and says we no longer have the ability to effectively fight them any more.
70 years of putting out easy little forest fires has given us unstoppable wild fires.

Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Thu Nov 07, 2019 8:26 pm
by WetEV
Oilpan4 wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 4:16 pm
70 years of putting out easy little forest fires has given us unstoppable wild fires.
Which is why the Camp Fire that burned Paradise roared over some recent past burn areas. Little trees, the regrowth from the past fires, dried out by a dry hot summer and fall, might as well have been gasoline. Right.

Fires don't follow a simple rule. Yes, some places/ecosystems do have the need for periodic fires. Some times on a nearly yearly basis, some times on a century or longer basis.

Wikipedia says:
Conditions immediately leading up to and during the fire combined to create a highly combustible fuel load:

Heavy grass cover due to a wet spring
An unusually dry fall
Decreased Humidity due to several recent wind events (23% dropping to 10%)
Unusually dry fuel (5% 1,000-hr. moisture level)
Hot, dry, sustained and gusting high winds (25-35 mph), including a Red Flag Warning on the day of the fire, similar to the Diablo wind or the Santa Ana winds of the California Coast Ranges.

The day of the fire, the fuel energy release component was above the historic record for November 8; the first fall rain is normally before November 1.
https://assets.documentcloud.org/docume ... -Sheet.pdf

What does heavy grass cover have to do with past fires? Grass is adapted to fire, a yearly burn would lead to more grass cover rather than less.
Same for an unusually dry fall? Nothing.
Decreased humidity? Nothing.
Unusually dry fuel? Nothing.


Consider a river. The Nile. Not just a river.

Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 8:47 am
by Oilpan4
More of a reason to practice responsible forestry like maintaining fire brakes on public lands and making sure power line right of ways are maintained.

Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 9:19 am
by WetEV
Oilpan4 wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 8:47 am
More of a reason to practice responsible forestry like maintaining fire brakes on public lands and making sure power line right of ways are maintained.
"Fire brakes"?

What kind of a fire break would help with a wind driven fire throwing embers a mile or more downwind? And the embers started new fires, due to the dry grass, low humidity, dry fuels.

Power line right of ways need to be maintained to prevent trees from falling on power lines. But again, not factual for the Camp Fire that burned Paradise. It was the power line, not the right of way, that was the apparent cause.

Re: PG&E Shutting off power.

Posted: Fri Nov 08, 2019 9:20 am
by Oilpan4
Do all fires have winds blow burning embers a mile ahead of the main fire?