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temperature and maybe CO2 gauge for interior cabin

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 11:19 am
by jlsoaz
I see a temp gauge for the temperature outdoors, but not for the interior. I see a goal temperature in the HVAC settings, but not a statement of what the temp is in my cabin.

In order to maximize range last night I drove in 32 weather but without the heater operating in the cabin. I am sort of wondering what the temp was. Also wondering if any fresh air is being brought in and whether I need to crack a window.

Ultimately, maybe more houses and cars should also have CO2 gauges to give a better idea of fresh air (might help with alertness while driving). I bought a CO2 gauge for my house when I was alerted by an energy audit that the house is very tight, and this has helped me to have a better handle on when/where/how-much to ventilate.

Re: temperature and maybe CO2 gauge for interior cabin

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 11:32 am
by EdmondLeaf
What was CO2 in the house before, and what is the range you are now?
The effects of increased CO2 levels on adults at good health can be summarized:

normal outdoor level: 350 - 450 ppm
acceptable levels: < 600 ppm
complaints of stiffness and odors: 600 - 1000 ppm
ASHRAE and OSHA standards: 1000 ppm
general drowsiness: 1000 - 2500 ppm
adverse health effects expected: 2500 - 5000 ppm
maximum allowed concentration within a 8 hour working period: 5000 ppm

Re: temperature and maybe CO2 gauge for interior cabin

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 7:11 pm
by jlsoaz
EdmondLeaf wrote:What was CO2 in the house before, and what is the range you are now?
The effects of increased CO2 levels on adults at good health can be summarized:

normal outdoor level: 350 - 450 ppm
acceptable levels: < 600 ppm
complaints of stiffness and odors: 600 - 1000 ppm
ASHRAE and OSHA standards: 1000 ppm
general drowsiness: 1000 - 2500 ppm
adverse health effects expected: 2500 - 5000 ppm
maximum allowed concentration within a 8 hour working period: 5000 ppm
When I got the alarm for I think about $250, it was set so the alarm would go off at 1000 ppm. It went off the first night and I started to do a better job of cracking my windows at night. Still, once in awhile I skimp on this, as it is very cold or something and I make the crack too fine, and then it goes off again. On a day where it is temperate enough for me to open the windows, it will get down to below 500 or 400.

Re: temperature and maybe CO2 gauge for interior cabin

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 7:33 pm
by braineo
use a stick up thermometer for a few bucks http://www.amazon.com/Component-Northwe ... hermometer" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

and please educate me, why would you put a CO2 meter in a car with no combustion chamber?

Re: temperature and maybe CO2 gauge for interior cabin

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 7:43 pm
by DeaneG
braineo wrote:...and please educate me, why would you put a CO2 meter in a car with no combustion chamber?
People are thermal engines, about 200 watts apiece, and produce CO2 almost constantly.

Re: temperature and maybe CO2 gauge for interior cabin

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2013 8:02 pm
by jlsoaz
braineo wrote:use a stick up thermometer for a few bucks http://www.amazon.com/Component-Northwe ... hermometer" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Thanks, I ordered one. That said, my point is also to suggest to Nissan the feature so that we do not have to come up with workarounds.
braineo wrote: and please educate me, why would you put a CO2 meter in a car with no combustion chamber?
Human beings breathe out CO2. When the room or car interior that they are in is sealed particularly tight, the accumulation of CO2 becomes a concern. When I drive my Leaf in cold weather, but need to travel a long distance and do not have time for a lot of recharging, I tend to try to avoid turning on the heat, so that I can get where I need to go. If I crack a window for ventilation, this is a bit much, so I tend to leave the windows closed or nearly so. There is a dashboard button/icon that indicates fresh air coming in from the outside, or not, but I'd be interested to have more granular information as to whether the air mix is healthy, if not warm.